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Practice Transformation Companion Newsletter: January 2022

Jan 28, 2022 | News

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Introduction to Palliative Care – January 18, 2022
This training will provide care team members with a foundation by which to begin introducing Palliative Care into the primary care practice. 

Course Objectives:
•    An introduction to Palliative Care
•    Focus on the Eight Domains of Palliative Care
•    The Multidisciplinary team
•    Communicating Palliative Care to patients and families

When: (Live Virtual)
January 18, 2022        1:00pm – 4:00pm

Cost: $150 

Register here:
https://cvent.me/44KQDP


Click here for flyer
 

OPPORTUNITY TO EARN CONTINUING EDUCATION CONTACT HOURS
Nursing:

  • Upon successful completion of the Introduction to Palliative Care Course, the participant will earn 2.4 Nursing CE contact hours
  • This nursing continuing professional development activity was approved by the Ohio Nurses Association, an accredited approver by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.(OBN-001-91)
  • ONA Activity# 2020-0000000632
  • Expiration date:  9/16/2022
Social Work:
  • Michigan Institute for Care Management and Transformation is an approved provider with the Michigan Social Work Continuing Education Collaborative.  Approved provider Number: MICEC 110216
 

Introduction to Team-Based Care – February 1-2, 2022
The Introduction to Team-Based Care course helps the learner better understand how to work in a multidisciplinary care team and in collaboration with the patient. Open to all members of the practice to gain foundational knowledge in Team-Based Care.

Introduction to Team-Based Care will include: 
•    Why, What, Who and How: Team-Based Care
•    Care Management Process
•    Outcomes and Triple AIM
•    Billing Applications

*This course is required for all care team members new to their role in order to bill PDCM codes.

When: (Live Virtual)
February 1, 2022        12:00pm – 4:30pm
February 2, 2022        9:00am – 11:30am
(Must attend both days to receive credits)

Cost: $300.00

Register Here:
https://cvent.me/Ez43eD


Click here for flyer

OPPORTUNITY TO EARN CONTINUING EDUCATION CONTACT HOURS
Nursing:

  • Upon successful completion of the Introduction to Palliative Care Course, the participant will earn 5.5 Nursing CE contact hours
  • This nursing continuing professional development activity was approved by the Ohio Nurses Association, an accredited approver by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.(OBN-001-91)
  • ONA Activity# 2020-0000001417
  • Expiration date:  7/16/23
Social Work:
  • Upon successful completion of the Introduction to Team Based Care course, the participant will earn 5.5 Social Work CE contact hours
  • Michigan Institute for Care Management and Transformation is an approved provider with the Michigan Social Work Continuing Education Collaborative.   Approved provider Number: MICEC 110216
 
 
January 2022 Blog
Do You Have Seasonal Affective Disorder?
Sometimes we don’t feel like ourselves, especially when the cold winter months in Michigan make us feel otherwise. Some people may feel a little sad or down when it is dark in the morning upon awakening and dark before we leave work or eat our dinner. We may not like winter with its unique stressors of ice, snow and the fearsome wintry mix. Our feelings can be generally negative about winter, and we dread it coming every year. We don’t enjoy winter activities or wearing a heavy coat, gloves and hat. We withdraw socially, crave comfort foods, gain weight and sleep too much. Even the beginning of fall brings us trepidation about winter. But as soon as we start seeing longer daylight hours in the spring, we feel more hopeful. Our days literally begin to brighten, and the abundance of sunshine makes us feel better. 

Mood changes that affect how we think and handle our activities of daily living may signal that we have seasonal affective disorder (SAD), which is a type of depression. SAD has a recurrent seasonal pattern that only lasts as long as the season that is bothering us. Winter SAD occurs more in women than men and is more common in people who live in the north where there are shorter daylight hours in the winter. Believe it or not, there is a summer SAD, but it is less common.

What causes SAD? Some evidence shows that sunlight plays a role in the brain’s production of serotonin and melatonin. During the winter our body produces less serotonin which fights depression and more melatonin which encourages sleep. Vitamin D deficiencies may also cause problems as vitamin D is believed to promote serotonin activity. We are exposed to less vitamin D during the reduced daylight hours in the winter months. All of these things, along with the negative thoughts we may already have about winter, fit into this. 

How can we treat SAD? There are also a few simple things that can be tried to ease symptoms:
  • Spend time outdoors every day
  • Plan a vacation to a warm, sunny place
  • Keep the window shades open in your home to let in the light
  • Stick to a sleep schedule and try not to oversleep
  • Exercise regularly
  • Eat healthy with a diet low in carbohydrates and high in whole grains, fruits and vegetables
  • Light therapy, which is sitting in front of a strong light box that has UV rays filtered out for 30-45 minutes in the morning from fall to spring. (Note: If you are concerned about a child, talk to your child’s doctor before using something like this.)
  • Use a dawn simulator which gradually brings light into your bedroom making the body think that sunrise has happened. Some of these may also help you fall asleep with items such as a sound machine and/or meditation. 
  • Take vitamin D

Winter SAD is predictable and some things on this list can be started in the fall. If items on this list don’t work for you and you feel your problem is more concerning, have a talk with your primary care provider. Other things that can help are antidepressant medication and behavioral therapy. If even more troubling symptoms such as feeling depressed most days, losing interest in activities, feeling hopeless or worthless, or thoughts of suicide or death, please get immediate help through your primary care provider, mental health specialist, or the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255).

Of course, our continued Covid winter doesn’t help SAD sufferers in any way. The isolation it has caused can contribute to our feelings. Do everything you can do from the above list to help yourself. Think spring. Bring on the sun and longer days. Take your vitamin D in the winter months. Get away to a sunny place such as Mexico or another warm country, where the beautiful beaches and the turquoise water reign supreme (fingers crossed for March.). Each day brings us a step closer to the end of winter SAD and beginning of another glorious spring.
https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/seasonal-affective-disorder 
 

Interested in Training at Your Workplace?

Contact us here! 

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